Why women should train in the MORNING

Why Women Should Workout IN THE MORNING: Exercising before noon is better for your heart, study finds

  • A study looked at physical activity levels while people wore a fitness tracker
  • People were divided into four groups, based on when they were most active
  • People who exercised in the morning were less likely to develop heart problems
  • This included a heart attack as well as the most common form of angina.

Women who exercise in the morning may have a lower risk of heart problems or stroke.

A study of over 85,000 people in the UK looked at their level of physical activity while wearing a fitness tracker for a week.

People were divided into four groups, including those who were most active early in the morning, around 8 a.m., and those most active mid-morning around 10 a.m.

The other two groups contained the most active people at noon and in the evening around 7 p.m.

A study of over 85,000 people in the UK looked at their level of physical activity while wearing a fitness tracker for a week

People who exercised in the morning or mid-morning had a lower risk of developing heart problems, including heart attack, the most common form of angina, and coronary heart disease.

Those who exercised mid-morning were less likely to have a stroke.

Gali Albalak, who led the study from Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, said: “It is well established that exercise is good for heart health, and our study now indicates that morning activity seems be the most beneficial.

“The results were particularly pronounced in females and applied to both early risers and night owls.”

The study, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, involved people aged 42 to 78 who had never had cardiovascular disease and had enrolled in the UK Biobank Health Study. .

After recording their exercise pace, they were followed for six to eight years, during which time 2,911 people developed heart problems and nearly 800 had strokes.

By comparing peak hours of activity over a 24-hour period, researchers found that being most active between 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. was linked to the lowest risk of heart disease and stroke. cerebral.

The group of people who exercised the most first, around 8 a.m., were 11% less likely to develop heart problems than the most active people around noon.

People who exercised the most mid-morning were 16% less likely to have heart problems and 17% less likely to have a stroke than people who were more active around noon.

The results held true whether people were generally more active or more inactive, and whether they described themselves as a morning person or an evening person.

But, when the results were analyzed separately for men and women, the researchers found that women seemed to benefit significantly from doing more exercise in the morning, while men did not.

Women who were most active in the early morning or late morning had more than a fifth lower risk of heart problems than those who exercised the most around midday.

Ms Albalak said: ‘It is too early for formal guidance to prioritize morning exercise as this is a fairly new area of ​​research.

“But we hope that one day we can refine the current recommendations by simply adding a line – ‘when exercising, it is advisable to do it in the morning’.”

Dr Raymond Noordam, lead author of the study from Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, said: “There is no doubt that exercise is beneficial regardless of the time of day, and c is the most important message.”

“But these new results show that doing most physical activity in the morning may be more beneficial.”

HOW MUCH EXERCISE YOU NEED

To stay healthy, adults ages 19 to 64 should try to be active daily and should do:

  • at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity such as cycling or brisk walking each week and
  • strength training 2 or more days a week that works all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms)

Or:

  • 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity such as running or a game of singles tennis each week and
  • strength training 2 or more days a week that works all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms)

Or:

  • a mix of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity each week – for example, 2 x 30 minutes of running plus 30 minutes of brisk walking equals 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity and
  • strength training 2 or more days a week that works all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms)

A good rule of thumb is that 1 minute of vigorous activity provides the same health benefits as 2 minutes of moderate activity.

One way to get your recommended 150 minutes of weekly physical activity is to do 30 minutes 5 days a week.

All adults should also break up long periods of sitting with light activity.

Source: NHS

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